Hard Times Pacoima
blackpaint20:

The fly as a symbol of the pagan god Beelzebub
The contrast between the positive aspect of the ants and the demonic of the flies is represented in this Mystical Crucifixion by the Spanish artist Joan Rosat (1445). In  the highlight shown, ants appear to the left of the painting as hard-working insects which symbolise the good Christians who collect and store up the Word of God, in contrast to the ant posed on Adam’s skull, an image of the sin of our first father which was redeemed by the blood of the crucified
The spider, being an industrious insect which patiently weaves its web, could be compared to the bee and the ant, but on occasions in the Christian dialect symbolises the astuteness of the devil because of the artful form in which it traps its victims into the net. Both St. Isodore of Seville in his Etimologias and another, later enyclopedist, Pierre de Beauvais (13th c.), identify the spider with the devil. Later, in the second half  of  the 14thc., The Book of Cats, a  Spanish translation of the fables of  Odo de Cheriton (13th c.) takes the example of the wasp and the spider; where the first is subtly trapped in the spider’s web, symbolising a soul captured in the devil’s net.
Quoted from source 

blackpaint20:

The fly as a symbol of the pagan god Beelzebub

The contrast between the positive aspect of the ants and the demonic of the flies is represented in this Mystical Crucifixion by the Spanish artist Joan Rosat (1445). In  the highlight shown, ants appear to the left of the painting as hard-working insects which symbolise the good Christians who collect and store up the Word of God, in contrast to the ant posed on Adam’s skull, an image of the sin of our first father which was redeemed by the blood of the crucified

The spider, being an industrious insect which patiently weaves its web, could be compared to the bee and the ant, but on occasions in the Christian dialect symbolises the astuteness of the devil because of the artful form in which it traps its victims into the net. Both St. Isodore of Seville in his Etimologias and another, later enyclopedist, Pierre de Beauvais (13th c.), identify the spider with the devil. Later, in the second half  of  the 14thc., The Book of Cats, a  Spanish translation of the fables of  Odo de Cheriton (13th c.) takes the example of the wasp and the spider; where the first is subtly trapped in the spider’s web, symbolising a soul captured in the devil’s net.

Quoted from source 

fabforgottennobility:

Frozen Volcano
iceland - 26 by S EICHHORN on Flickr.

fabforgottennobility:

Frozen Volcano

iceland - 26 by S EICHHORN on Flickr.

did-you-kno:

The world’s longest ectopic pregnancy belongs to a woman from India who unknowingly had the skeletal remains of an unborn baby inside of her for 36 years.   Source

did-you-kno:

The world’s longest ectopic pregnancy belongs to a woman from India who unknowingly had the skeletal remains of an unborn baby inside of her for 36 years. Source

artofalbumcovers:

Electric Wizard - Come My Fanatics… (1997)

From a screen grab taken from the BBC documentary ‘The Power of the Witch’ which shows a photo of Anton LaVey during a Satanic sermon.

Sample

Submitted by Dr. Spark

lolfactory:

The anthropologists decided that this tribe was to remain “uncontacted”.

lolfactory:

The anthropologists decided that this tribe was to remain “uncontacted”.


“Anything you see in me is in you. If you want to see a vicious killer, that’s who you’ll see, do you understand that? If you see me as your brother, that’s what I’ll be. It all depends on how much love you have. I am you, and when you can admit that, you will be free. I am just a mirror.”
- Charles Manson 

Anything you see in me is in you. If you want to see a vicious killer, that’s who you’ll see, do you understand that? If you see me as your brother, that’s what I’ll be. It all depends on how much love you have. I am you, and when you can admit that, you will be free. I am just a mirror.”

- Charles Manson 

congenitaldisease:

La Pascualita or Little Pascuala is a bridal mannequin that has “lived” in a store window in Chihuahua, Mexico for the past 75 years. That is quite a long time for a bridal gown shop to retain a mannequin, but then the dummy has a rather strange history behind it. According to an urban legend, La Pascualita isn’t a dummy at all, but the perfectly preserved corpse of the previous owner’s daughter.

congenitaldisease:

La Pascualita or Little Pascuala is a bridal mannequin that has “lived” in a store window in Chihuahua, Mexico for the past 75 years. That is quite a long time for a bridal gown shop to retain a mannequin, but then the dummy has a rather strange history behind it. According to an urban legend, La Pascualita isn’t a dummy at all, but the perfectly preserved corpse of the previous owner’s daughter.